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PAUL CAREY has more information on Project Encore, a website and movement dedicated to getting works that have already been premiered a second hearing. I heard about this project a few years ago and think it’s great. Even when a work is favorably received, sometimes it doesn’t easily get performed again.

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PAUL CAREY discusses MusicSpoke on his blog: “We let the composers control their own music. Since we are a marketplace and not a publisher, the composers retain their copyrights. If we use Paul’s $1 analogy, [click here for that discussion in an earlier blogpost] we give the composers 70 cents of every dollar instead of 10 cents. We are using the 30 cents that we keep to maintain the marketplace and promote the composers through advertising and conferences.

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PAUL CAREY CONTINUES On the Music Publishing Industry: “We realized that together we could afford channels of visibility, marketing, and advertising that would be too expensive for each of us individually. We decided to have a joint web site with a joint catalog and links to our individual web sites, all tied together with a unified visual style. Purchases are done on our individual web sites, which makes our financial arrangements easier to handle than having a joint business model.

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PAUL CAREY: Music Publishing Trends, Continued with an article by Fahad Siadat: “The reason I started See-A-Dot Music Publishing was because I saw a need for a different kind of publisher, one who partners with an artist to help their career grow and provides a well curated resource of quality music to ensemble leaders. It’s important to understand publishers don’t serve composers, we serve conductors.

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PAUL CAREY has started a series of posts on music publishing, starting with the old way:

The publisher would have to proof the scribbles of the composer (and I mean scribbles!) and then set about creating a layout, with EVERY ELEMENT then punched into a zinc metal plate, BACKWARDS for every page! Ponder that for a moment. Whether a simple little Schumann song, or a Dvorak string quartet, or Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring- everything was HAND PUNCHED by extremely diligent craftsmen onto metal plates, which then were sent to the printing presses. Think of the enormous variety of elements within a musical score- each note, beam, slur marking, each hairpin dynamic, each fermata, etched into a metal plate by hand! I think the younger you are, the more you may be unaware of how printing music used to be accomplished before computer engraving software such as Finale or Sibelius.  What we have with Finale now would seem like absolute wizardry to people from the past.

I’ve always agreed with the idea that “these are the good old days.”

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JOSHUA BRONFMAN shares Richard Hamming’s insights as to How to Win a Nobel Prize: “‘Transform isolated problems into general problems’ – I love this. Having problems with this student or this problem or finding this music. Find the answer, and allow the topic to open up into something new and broader.

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Choral Composer Stephen Paulus has died. I always appreciated his music and his thoughtfulness and had the chance to meet him on a couple of occasions. His music has such versatility and respect for the various text settings that he used.