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THE YOUNG CONDUCTOR VII: GAINING EXPERIENCE.  ” I always felt that when the conductor asked someone to sing, the conductor owed the singer, not the other way around. So if there was a schedule or other conflict there was little sense of loyalty to the ensemble. So when I started my first chamber choir, I quite deliberately did not ask any of my friends to sing. If they decided to audition, that was fine–they were indicating their interest in singing in the choir.

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EMILY FRIZZELL ON Choosing Literature for Developing Voices:  “Your music choices directly correlate to the amount of success you and your choirs will achieve.” Lots of great stuff on that blog to explore.

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PAUL CAREY HAS AN PREVIEW OF The 2014 ACDA Central Conference in Cincinnati.  I just returned from the Western Division conference which was  a great success.  I like staggering these conferences, though I’m sure Tim Sharp is running on empty at this time of year.

 

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MUSICIANS INCREASINGLY REALIZING THAT STREAMING SERVICES ARE ACTUALLY A REALLY GOOD THING:

For over four years now, we’ve been somewhat mystified by the hatred from some musicians and labels towards streaming services like Spotify. The general complaint seems to be that “it doesn’t pay enough,” but “enough” is often at ridiculously high standards. I’ve now seen three separate analyses that show that, on a per listener-per play basis, Spotify pays more than any other source. The problem, it often seems, is one of expectations. Part of it is simply that musicians seem to forget that their labels take a giant chunk of their earnings, and that the payments that eventually trickle down to musicians are often months or years late. Also, those doing the complaining often seem unable to comprehend that these services take time to grow, and as they grow, the payouts get bigger and bigger. But the biggest mistake of all seems to be the idea that not having your music where your fans want it is somehow a good idea. 

I am not an expert on the revenue model from streaming companies such as Spotify, but I would not be surprised if musicians find a way to make these services work for them.  Spotify has a large catalogue already, but perhaps local orchestras and choral organizations can find new revenue sources in this manner without having to produce traditional albums.

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Just a quick post to thank you all for the support of this blog.  We have passed our one-year anniversary and I am grateful to all of the readers and supporters out there.  I want to remind readers of three ways to help out.  For those of you who shop at Amazon or SheetMusicPlus, please click on my referral links here or on the home page when you shop.  There’s also my referral link to Dropbox, a cloud storage app that backs up your files and syncs across computers.  There’s no extra cost to you, and you help defray the hosting costs of my website.  I really appreciate it!

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JEFF TILLINGHAST: Turn your Mac into a Sheet Music Database.  I like the idea of scanning my music, especially since storage is so cheap these days (as well as cloud storage).  I recently read the ibook Paperless, and have scanned a number of files at home, but haven’t yet taken the plunge for music.  

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RICHARD SPARKS on gaining experience as a young conductor: “The first and best option for most young conductors (even undergraduates) is to find a position as church choir conductor.”