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Scott Dorsey has a writeup of his experiences at the 2007 ACDA Conference in Miami.

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The Atlantic has a piece showing that it is a learned trait to hear music as beautiful.  The results come from a study of what trained musicians heard vs. untrained listeners.  “Trained musicians, perhaps predictably, were more sensitive to dissonance than lay listeners. But they also found that when listeners hadn’t previously encountered a certain chord, they found it nearly impossible to hear the individual notes that comprised it. Where this ability was lacking, the chords sounded dissonant, and thus, unpleasant.”  The study’s conclusions don’t seem all that controversial in some ways — why would Westerners find non-Western music to sound “weird” initially, and vice versa.  But I guess it also means that Schönberg, Webern, and Cage were right all along.  If we listened to atonality more, we would train ourselves to hear what is going on and appreciate it.

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Three tips for Owning Your Name on Google’s First-Page Results by Kathy Shaidle.  That goes for your name or your choir’s website as well.

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Instead of getting your ACDA National Conference book at the registration desk, they are sending out the 228-book essentially as the March issue of the ACDA Choral Journal.  I think that’s great since I have found previous books helpful for remembering programs and literature, and not everybody makes it to the National Conference.  Just one more incentive to be a member — remember, student membership is just $35.

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Swedish conductor Eric Ericson has died.  He was such a giant in the choral world, and so important to Scandinavian choral music specifically.

UPDATE: Richard Sparks has more on Eric Ericson here.